Category Archives: Amazon Elastic Computing Cloud (EC2)

AWS Reserved Instances Marketplace Should Also Give Back AWS Credits Not Just Cash

Amazon recently introduced the AWS Reserved Instances Marketplace. The idea is great – allow people to sell their reserved instances which they don’t need for whatever reason instead of losing the reservation money (or if you are in heavy utilization – the complete run cost of the instance 24 x 7 x Number of years you reserved).

Before you can sell a reserved instance you need to setup various details to which Amazon will wire the money – however if you are not located in the US or have a US bank account you are out of luck. Unfortunately for me – I’m located in Israel with no US bank account.

Instead of messing with various taxing issues I would like to suggest AWS to simply give back AWS credits. That is – if I sell my reserved instance for $100 I should have the option of directly crediting my AWS account with $100 which I can then use on various AWS services.

I know AWS has some mechanism to work with such a thing since they do give out gift/trial credits all the time. I also know that the Amazon Associates program for referring customers to Amazon can give you back Amazon gift certificates instead of actual money.

Just a thought that would keep the money inside the AWS ecosystem while making non US customers happy.

Quick & Dirty API for Accessing Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 Pricing Data

Continuing my post about the JSON files used in the Amazon EC2 Page, I’ve created a small Python library that also acts as a command line interface to get the data.
The data in the JSON files does not contain the same values as the EC2 API for things like region name and instance types so the library/cli translates these values to their corresponding values in the EC2 API.

You can filter the output by region, instance type and OS type.

The command line output support a human readable table format, JSON and CSV.

To use the command line you’ll need to install the following Python libraries:

  • argparse – only if you are using Python < 2.7 (argparse is included in Python 2.7 and 3.x)
  • prettytable – if you want to print the human readable and pretty good looking ASCII table output

Both libraries can be installed using pip.
Grab the code from Github

Don’t forget to send feedback! Enjoy!

 

Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 Pricing Data

Have you ever wanted a way to access the Amazon Web Services EC2 pricing data from code?

It seems Amazon uses predefined JSON files in the EC2 page to display the pricing per region per instance type and type of utilization.

You can easily access these JSON files, load it and use it in your own apps (at least until Amazon changes these URLs).

The naming in these JSON files is sometimes different than the naming used in the API so for example, a small instance (m1.small) is “size” : “sm” and its type is “stdODI” or “stdResI” for reserved instances.

Below are the links to the relevant files:

On Demand Instances

Reserved Instances

Data Transfer Pricing

Cloud Watch Pricing

Elastic IPs Pricing

Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) Pricing

 

Crunch these files and enjoy it while its there 🙂

The cool example of SaaS for developers by @mza and @jeffbarr

In a recent post on the AWS blog, Jeff Barr and Matt Wood, showed the architecture and code they wrote which lists the most interesting AWS related jobs from the Amazon Jobs site.

It serves as a rather good example of how service components such as the ones AWS provides (SNS, SQS, S3 to name a few that are AWS agnostic) a great set of building blocks that can easily help you focus on writing the code you really need to write.

I found the auto scaling policy for spinning up & down machines just to tweet a bit of an over kill at first (and Jeff could have easily added the code on the same instance running the cron), however thinking about it  a bit more and considering the various pricing strategies it actually makes a lot sense.

The cloud is more than just the hardware – its also about services!

When talking about the cloud, most people talk about running the servers on the cloud. They talk about the fact that they can start or stop virtual servers with a simple API call.

Cloud Services Toolbox
taken by keepthebyte

A lot of Cloud Providers do provide you with virtual servers, virtual load balancer and infinite (and/or scalable) storage, but these are all building block of servers. You still need to do the heavy lifting of taking a bunch of servers and making it do the work for you. You need to install the software (not just the one you wrote), mange, handling disaster recovery, backups, logging, etc.

What makes Amazon’s cloud unique on top of the servers and storage they provide is the fact that it provides a set of cloud services that can be used as black boxes for your application/service reducing the code you need to write/maintain as well as the number of servers you need to administer. These services are also available for use outside of Amazon’s cloud but there are benefits of using them within your EC2 instances.

The Amazon non-hardware cloud services offering is split into two categories:

  • Off the shelf services – These are preconfigured services that Amazon takes most of the hassle off of managing it. Such services are
    • Amazon Relational Database Services (RDS) – Hosted MySQL which Amazon manage, patches and helps you backup and restore as well as deploy in a smart way across multiple availability zones.
    • Amazon ElastiCache – Hosted Memcached which Amazon manages, allows to resize (add or remove servers) as well as patch with the latest software.
  • Development Building Blocks (Black Boxes) – Web services that provides functionality which you can mix and match to create you service, removing the need for you to handle the load, machines and configuration of these services. Such services are:
    • Amazon SimpleDB – an Amazon written key/value datastore that is hosted and operated by Amazon. Scalable and simple. It just works
    • Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) – A reliable, scalable, persistent queue service. Great for talking with distributed async components.
    • Amazon Simple Email Service (SES) – A scalable Email service which allows you to send Email (for humans and machines)
    • Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) –  A web service to send notifications to people/machines/service/etc. It allows to send the notification out as an Email or as an HTTP request as well as post it to an SQS queue

What I love the most about Amazon Web Services is the fact that when they do provide a certain Development Building Block such as Simple Email Service (SES), they do so without killing or harming the competition. There is still enough value and features in other Email services such as mailgun, SendGrid and MailChimp for them to co-exist with SES.

Not stepping (too much) on web services developers toes is not something to dismiss and I would love to see the innovation that comes out of Cloud based web services in the future.

Go cloud services! 🙂

ec2ssh – Quicker SSH-ing Into Your EC2 Instances

Ever since Amazon introduced tags in EC2 I felt such a relief that I can name my instances and actually remember which one is which.

It took a while for Name tags to find its way to various aspects of the AWS Console, however, connecting to machines still requires a way to find the IP address from the console or via a command line using the EC2 API Tools.

I thought that it would be much easier for me and others to utilize the Name tags to connect more easily to the machines.

Initially, the script was a simple bash script which utilizes a the ec2-describe-instances command with a flag that matched the Name attribute, however, managed various other command line parameters such as the user name to connect with (ubuntu images, for example, users the ‘ubuntu’ user instead of ‘root’. Amazon Linux AMI uses ‘ec2user’, etc) so I’ve decided to rewrite it in Python and use the magnificent Boto Python library.

This allowed better argument handling as well as remove the need to install Java and the EC2 API Tools to access the EC2 API.

Grab the code here

Don’t forget to send some feedback!